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Presidential election us

presidential election us

ZEIT ONLINE collected votes as part of its global US election poll. While the majority have backed the Democrats, bots are a different story altogether. In , it's once again time for the U.S. to elect it's president. Just like every four years the question But how exactly does the election work in the U.S.? To expl. This is the first book on the U.S. presidential election system to analyze the basic principles underlying the design of the existing system and those at the heart of.

Among Democratic identifiers, 91 percent of women are voting for Clinton compared to 85 percent of men. This again points to the gender gap in Pennsylvania.

Among the voters who say they strongly favor their candidate, their support is split between Clinton and Trump. Among those who say they dislike the other candidate, 46 percent support Trump as compared with 39 percent voting for Clinton.

Rather than manning up he goes and does a thing like that. The Trumps visited a Midtown Manhattan polling place Tuesday morning to cast their votes.

Both candidates are viewed unfavorably by a majority of voters. More than half of voters 54 percent have an unfavorable view of Hillary Clinton, and 61 percent have an unfavorable view of Donald Trump.

Trump is currently winning the change voters. Meanwhile, Clinton is performing well among those who prioritize experience and judgment.

Trump is seen as better able to handle the economy, while Clinton has the advantage when considering foreign policy.

Similar to pre-election polls, more see Clinton as qualified and having the right temperament. About half of voters said that Clinton is qualified to be president 53 percent , as compared to Trump 37 percent.

Similarly, over half of voters said that Clinton has the temperament to be president, whereas only 34 percent said the same of Trump. Neither candidate is seen as honest and trustworthy.

Almost two thirds 60 percent say Clinton is not honest and trustworthy, and 65 percent say the same about Trump. ET As we wait for polls to close in an additional 16 states plus the District of Columbia at 8 p.

ET, here are some more exit poll results from Virginia:. The majority of female voters in Virginia say they voted for Clinton 57 percent, versus 38 percent for Trump while males favored Trump 49 percent for Trump, versus 44 percent for Clinton.

Of white non-college graduates in Virginia, support is split: Clinton wins 50 percent and Trump takes 45 percent.

Among white college graduates, Clinton has more early voters 56 percent, versus 37 percentfor Trump. Clinton gets the majority of support from the younger Virginia voters to year-olds , with 53 percent of the exit poll voters favoring Clinton versus 34 percent for Trump.

Ohio is a tossup, and in North Carolina, Clinton has an edge over Trump. In Virginia, Clinton now also has an edge.

The Enquirer reported that Kasich is likely to give the speech even if Trump wins. ET Here are more findings from the national early exit polls and how voters feel about several top issues:.

Seventy-one percent of voters say that illegal immigrants working in the U. Almost 9 in 10 Clinton voters want illegal immigrants offered a chance to apply for legal status, while Trump voters are split with 49 percent supporting legal status and 45 percent saying they should be deported.

There is more division over building a wall along the border with Mexico: Eighty-eight percent of Clinton voters oppose building a wall, while three quarters of Trump voters support it.

Voters also have very different views on the effects of international trade on U. Clinton voters are more likely to believe that trade creates jobs while Trump voters say that it takes away U.

In Georgia, Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia the majority of voters said the most important issue facing the country was the economy.

When voters were asked, finding a president who can bring needed change is the most important quality when deciding their vote for president. The majority of Florida voters 70 percent believe that illegal immigrants should be offered a chance to apply for legal status.

Over half 59 percent say that immigrants in the U. Almost half of New Hampshire 46 percent and Pennsylvania 42 percent voters are dissatisfied with the federal government.

ET The first round of early exit polls are in. Here are a few highlights: Voters nationally said they were looking for a candidate who can bring needed change, followed by experience and judgment.

In addition, 69 percent say they are dissatisfied or angry about the way the federal government is working. The economy was by far the top issue among voters this fall.

Asked to name their most important issue, 52 percent named the economy; 18 percent said terrorism, 13 percent said foreign policy and 12 percent said immigration.

In the tweet, Trump cites a CNN report on voting irregularities in Utah, which appears to be from this blog:. Just out according to CNN: A spokesman for former President George W.

Bush said Tuesday that Bush did not vote for either Trump or Clinton. I appreciate his views on a strong America and the need to rebuild our military.

I will be watching the election results from Trump Tower in Manhattan with my family and friends. But Trump lawyers also went beyond that, asking for the names of pollsters and data from machines.

At the 2 p. The judge seemed particularly bothered by the request to sequester ballots from a location — to match them up with specific people — and said that there is no way to do that.

See some of the best moments as Americans chose their next president. ET Trump, in a Fox News interview Tuesday afternoon, weighed in on the state of the election but declined to give a clear answer on if he would accept the outcome.

On whether he would accept election results if he loses the presidential election, Trump said this: Asked to clarify whether he was saying whether the election will not be over Tuesday night, Trump responded in the negative.

The workers were allegedly interfering with the voting process. CBS4 Miami said that voting was not interrupted during the incident, and at this point, no other incidents have been reported at any South Florida voting precincts.

The suit alleges that the polls were open beyond closing time on Friday, the last day of early voting, and an emergency hearing on the matter is scheduled for 2 p.

ET in the matter. In many states, the violation carries potential fines or jail terms. ET Check out the percent of the vote during the early voting period in key states.

ET Keep track of. Republicans are aiming to hold on to their majority in the House, which they won back control of in the midterm elections.

Republicans currently hold House seats and Democrats hold House seats. Three seats are vacant. There are 30 Republican seats with no incumbent running and 19 Democratic seats open.

ET Keep track of all of the developments in the battle for the Senate in our live-blog for those races. The stakes are high for Congress this election cycle.

Republicans have to defend twice as many Senate seats compared to the Democrats, who only n The polling location is at St.

Thomas Aquinas church, where Pence and his wife Karen first met. As a freshman in law school, Pence says he saw a brunette woman playing the guitar and went to speak to her after the sermon.

ET Hillary Clinton wins the vote on the U. Socialist candidate Emidio Soltysik, the only third-party candidate on the ballot, took in 4. Trump traveled four blocks from his campaign headquarters by motorcade.

As he exited the vehicle, he gave one wave to his left and one to his right. Some on the sidewalk shouted encouragement, while some greeted the GOP nominee with boos and jeers.

Inside the polling location, Trump bought a cupcake from a child selling baked goods near the voting booths.

If he loses, would he concede, the pool reporter also asked. Trump said that we will see what happens. The GOP nominee also said he though he campaign had gone well.

CBS Boston confirmed the letter, read by Trump to a Manchester crowd , was in fact written by the Patriots head coach. Your leadership is amazing.

I have always had tremendous respect for you, but the toughness and perseverance you have displayed over the past year is remarkable. All my friends and my neighbors, it makes me so happy.

McNair--an Election Day ritual that dates back to his own presidential campaigns, according to the White House pool.

For just under one minute, everyone did their best impressions of a frozen-in-time mannequin while a camera moved through the cabin, eventually landing on Hillary Clinton at the front of the plane, as she was speaking to Bon Jovi.

Huma Abedin stood near by. Then Hillary Clinton blinked and everyone started moving again. A staffer for Bill Clinton suggested it, and they put the whole thing together in about 25 minutes, then shared it with the campaign embeds when they landed in New York.

Kaine emphasized that the issue Tuesday is turning out voters, but he also acknowledged that the Latino vote could make a huge difference in some of the battleground states.

And that is an empowering thing. ET Tim Kaine cast his vote early this morning -- around 6 a. The polls in most areas open at either 6 a.

ET The first votes are in, and Donald Trump is off to a very early lead in the presidential election, winning over the voters of three tiny New Hampshire precincts by a margin over Hillary Clinton.

Alexander Hamilton, always intriguing against Adams, tried to throw some votes to Jefferson in order to elect Pinckney president.

Instead, Adams won with 71 votes; Jefferson became vice president, with 68; Pinckney came in third with 59; Burr received only 30; and 48 votes went to various other candidates.

The significance of the election lay in the fact that it entailed the first peaceful transfer of power between parties under the U.

This peaceful transfer occurred despite defects in the Constitution that caused a breakdown of the electoral system. During the campaign, Federalists attacked Jefferson as an un-Christian deist, tainted by his sympathy for the increasingly bloody French Revolution.

Unfortunately, the system still provided no separate votes for president and vice president, and Republican managers failed to deflect votes from their vice-presidential candidate, Aaron Burr.

Therefore, Jefferson and Burr tied with 73 votes each; Adams received 65 votes, his vice-presidential candidate, Charles C. Pinckney, 64, and John Jay, 1.

This result threw the election into the House of Representatives , where each state had one vote, to be decided by the majority of its delegation.

Left to choose between Jefferson and Burr, most Federalists supported Burr. Burr for his part disclaimed any intention to run for the presidency, but he never withdrew, which would have ended the contest.

Although the Republicans in the same election had won a decisive majority of 65 to 39 in the House, election of the president fell to the outgoing House, which had a Federalist majority.

But despite this majority, two state delegations split evenly, leading to another deadlock between Burr and Jefferson. After the House cast 19 identical tie ballots on February 11, , Governor James Monroe of Virginia assured Jefferson that if a usurpation was attempted, he would call the Virginia Assembly into session, implying that they would discard any such result.

After six days of uncertainty, Federalists in the tied delegations of Vermont and Maryland abstained, electing Jefferson, but without giving him open Federalist support.

The election was a landslide victory for the incumbent Thomas Jefferson and vice-presidential candidate George Clinton Republicans over the Federalist candidates, Charles C.

Pinckney and Rufus King. The vote was The election was the first held under the Twelfth Amendment, which separated electoral college balloting for president and vice president.

The Federalists alienated many voters by refusing to commit their electors to any particular candidate prior to the election. Jefferson was also helped by the popularity of the Louisiana Purchase and his reduction of federal spending.

The repeal of the excise tax on whiskey was especially popular in the West. Republican James Madison was elevated to the presidency in the election of Madison won electoral votes to Federalist Charles C.

In the early stages of the election campaign, Madison also faced challenges from within his own party by Monroe and Clinton.

The main issue of the election was the Embargo Act of The banning of exports had hurt merchants and other commercial interests, although ironically it encouraged domestic manufactures.

These economic difficulties revived the Federalist opposition, especially in trade-dependent New England. In the contest James Madison was reelected president by the narrowest margin of any election since the Republican party had come to power in He received electoral votes to 89 for his Federalist opponent DeWitt Clinton, the lieutenant governor of New York.

The War of , which had begun five months earlier, was the dominant issue. Opposition to the war was concentrated in the northeastern Federalist states.

Clintonians accused Madison, too, of slighting the defense of the New York frontier against the British in Canada.

The election proved to be the last one of significance for the Federalist party, largely owing to anti-British American nationalism engendered by the war.

In this election Republican James Monroe won the presidency with electoral votes, carrying every state except Massachusetts, Connecticut , and Delaware.

Federalist Rufus King received the votes of the 34 Federalist electors. Tompkins of New York was elected vice president with electoral votes, his opposition scattered among several candidates.

Many Republicans objected to the succession of Virginia presidents and believed Crawford a superior choice to the mediocre Monroe. The caucus vote was In the general election, opposition to Monroe was disorganized.

The Hartford Convention of growing out of opposition to the War of had discredited the Federalists outside their strongholds, and they put forth no candidate.

To some extent, Republicans had siphoned off Federalist support with nationalist programs like the Second Bank of the United States.

In addition, the extension of slavery into the territories became a political issue when Missouri sought admission as a slave state. Maryland , which expanded the power of Congress and of private corporations at the expense of the states.

But despite these problems, Monroe faced no organized opposition for reelection in , and the opposition party, the Federalists, ceased to exist.

William Plumer of New Hampshire, the one elector who voted against Monroe, did so be-cause he thought Monroe was incompetent. He cast his ballot for John Quincy Adams.

Later in the century, the fable arose that Plumer had cast his dissenting vote so that only George Washington would have the honor of unanimous election.

Plumer never mentioned Washington in his speech explaining his vote to the other New Hampshire electors. The Republican party broke apart in the election.

The nomination of candidates by congressional caucus was discredited. Groups in each state nominated candidates for the presidency, resulting in a multiplicity of favorite-son candidacies.

By the fall of four candidates remained in the running. William Crawford of Georgia, the secretary of the treasury, had been the early front-runner, but severe illness hampered his candidacy.

Secretary of State John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts had a brilliant record of government service, but his Federalist background, his cosmopolitanism, and his cold New England manner cost him support outside his own region.

Henry Clay of Kentucky , the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Andrew Jackson of Tennessee , who owed his popularity to his victory over the British at the Battle of New Orleans , were the other candidates.

With four candidates, none received a majority. Jackson received 99 electoral votes with , popular votes The choice of president therefore fell to the House of Representatives.

Many politicians assumed that House Speaker Henry Clay had the power to choose the next president but not to elect himself.

Clay threw his support to Adams, who was then elected. Calhoun was chosen vice president by the electoral college with a majority of votes.

Andrew Jackson won the presidency in by a landslide, receiving a record , popular votes 56 percent to , 44 percent for the incumbent John Quincy Adams.

Calhoun won the vice presidency with electoral votes to 83 for Richard Rush and 7 for William Smith. The emergence of two parties promoted popular interest in the election.

Local party groups sponsored parades, barbecues, tree plantings, and other popular events designed to promote Jackson and the local slate.

The National-Republicans, the party of Adams and Henry Clay, lacked the local organizations of the Democrats, but they did have a clear platform: Both parties spread false and exaggerated rumors about the opposition.

And they painted the incumbent president as a decadent aristocrat, who had procured prostitutes for the czar while serving as U.

The National-Republicans portrayed Jackson as a violent frontier ruffian, the son, some said, of a prostitute married to a mulatto. When Jackson and his wife, Rachel, married, the couple believed that her first husband had obtained a divorce.

After learning the divorce had not yet been made final, the couple held a second, valid wedding. Now the Adams men claimed Jackson was a bigamist and an adulterer.

Democratic-Republican Andrew Jackson was reelected in with , popular votes Jackson easily carried the electoral college with votes.

Clay received only 49, and Wirt won the 7 votes of Vermont. Martin Van Buren won the vice presidency with votes against 97 for various other candidates.

National-Republicans attacked the veto, arguing that the Bank was needed to maintain a stable currency and economy. For the first time in American politics, a third party, the Anti-Masons, challenged the two major parties.

Many politicians of note participated, including Thaddeus Stevens, William H. Seward, and Thurlow Weed.

The Anti-Masons protested Masonic secrecy. They feared a conspiracy to control American political institutions, a fear fed by the fact that both the major party candidates, Jackson and Clay, were prominent Masons.

The Anti-Masons convened the first national presidential nominating convention in Baltimore on September 26, The other parties soon followed suit, and the convention replaced the discredited caucus system of nomination.

The election of was largely a referendum on Andrew Jackson, but it also helped shape what is known as the second party system. His running mate, Col.

Johnson, claimed to have killed Indian chief Tecumseh. Johnson was controversial because he lived openly with a black woman.

Disdaining the organized politics of the Democrats, the new Whig party ran three candidates, each strong in a different region: William Henry Harrison of Indiana.

Van Buren won the election with , popular votes, only Harrison led the Whigs with 73 electoral votes, White receiving 26 and Webster Johnson, who failed to win an electoral majority, was elected vice president by the Democratic Senate.

The Whig vice-presidential nominee was John Tyler , a onetime Democrat who had broken with Jackson over his veto of the bill rechartering the Second Bank.

Harrison won by a popular vote of 1,, to 1,,, and an electoral margin of to But the victory proved to be a hollow one because Harrison died one month after his inauguration.

Tyler, his successor, would not accept Whig economic doctrine, and the change in presidential politics had little effect on presidential policy.

The election of introduced expansion and slavery as important political issues and contributed to westward and southern growth and sectionalism.

Southerners of both parties sought to annex Texas and expand slavery. Dallas was nominated for vice president to appease Van Burenites, and the party backed annexation and settling the Oregon boundary dispute with England.

But, pressured by southerners, Clay endorsed annexation, although concerned it might cause war with Mexico and disunion, and thereby lost support among antislavery Whigs.

Enough New Yorkers voted for Birney to throw 36 electoral votes and the election to Polk, who won the electoral college, , and a slim popular victory.

John Tyler signed a joint congressional resolution admitting Texas, but Polk pursued Oregon, and then northern Mexico in the Mexican War, aggravating tension over slavery and sectional balance and leading toward the Compromise of The election of underscored the increasingly important role of slavery in national politics.

Democratic president James K. Polk did not seek reelection. His party nominated Senator Lewis Cass of Michigan , who created the concept of squatter, or popular, sovereignty letting the settlers of a territory decide whether to permit slavery , with Gen.

Butler of Kentucky for vice president. Antislavery groups formed the Free-Soil party, whose platform promised to prohibit the spread of slavery, and chose former president Martin Van Buren of New York for president and Charles Francis Adams, the son of President John Quincy Adams, of Massachusetts for vice president.

The Whig nominee was the Mexican War hero, Gen. Zachary Taylor , a slave owner. For his part, Taylor professed moderation on slavery, and he and the Whigs were successful.

Taylor defeated Cass, 1,, to 1,, in popular votes and to in electoral votes. With the Taylor-Fillmore ticket elected, the forces had been set in motion for the events surrounding the Compromise of The election rang a death knell for the Whig party.

Both parties split over their nominee and the issue of slavery. King of Alabama as his running mate. Graham of New Jersey for vice president.

They nominated Senator John P. Southern Whigs were suspicious of Scott, whom they saw as a tool of antislavery senator William H.

Seward of New York. The election was waged by new political coalitions and was the first to confront directly the issue of slavery.

The violence that followed the Kansas- Nebraska Act destroyed the old political system and past formulas of compromises. The Whig party was dead. Donelson for vice president.

The Democratic party, portraying itself as the national party, nominated James Buchanan for president and John C. Breckinridge for vice president. Its platform supported the Kansas-Nebraska Act and noninterference with slavery.

This election saw the emergence of a new, sectional party composed of ex-Whigs, Free-Soil Democrats, and antislavery groups.

The Republican party opposed the extension of slavery and promised a free-labor society with expanded opportunities for white workers.

It nominated military hero, John C. Dayton for vice president. The physical assault by Congressman Preston S.

Brooks of South Carolina on Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts on the floor of the Senate heightened northern resentment of southern aggressiveness.

Although the Democratic candidate, Buchanan, won with electoral votes and 1,, votes, the divided opposition gained more popular votes. The Republican party captured 1,, votes and in the electoral college, and the American party received , popular and 8 electoral votes.

At the Republican convention, front-runner William H. Seward of New York faced insurmountable obstacles: Hoping to carry moderate states like Illinois and Pennsylvania, the party nominated Abraham Lincoln of Illinois for president and Senator Hannibal Hamlin of Maine for vice president.

The Republican platform called for a ban on slavery in the territories, internal improvements, a homestead act, a Pacific railroad, and a tariff.

The Democratic convention, which met at Charleston, could not agree on a candidate, and most of the southern delegates bolted.

Reconvening in Baltimore, the convention nominated Senator Stephen A. By carrying almost the entire North, Lincoln won in the electoral college with votes to 72 for Breckinridge, 39 for Bell, and 12 for Douglas.

Lincoln won a popular plurality of about 40 percent, leading the popular vote with 1,, to 1,, for Douglas, , for Breckinridge, and , for Bell. With the election of a sectional northern candidate, the Deep South seceded from the Union, followed within a few months by several states of the Upper South.

McClellan, the general who had commanded the Army of the Potomac until his indecision and delays caused Lincoln to remove him.

At first, Radical Republicans, fearing defeat, talked of ousting Lincoln in favor of the more ardently antislavery secretary of the treasury Salmon P.

Chase , or Generals John C. But in the end they fell in behind the president. The Republicans attracted Democratic support by running as the Union party and putting Johnson, a pro-war Democrat, on the ticket.

Lincoln won in a landslide, owing partly to a policy of letting soldiers go home to vote. But the military successes of Generals Ulysses S.

Grant in Virginia and William T. Sherman in the Deep South were probably more important. The electoral vote was to Democrats did better in state elections.

In this contest, Republican Ulysses S. The Democrats attacked the Republican management of Reconstruction and black suffrage. Grant, a moderate on Reconstruction, was accused of military despotism and anti-Semitism, and Colfax, of nativism and possible corruption.

Grant won the popular vote, 3,, to 2,,, and carried the electoral college by to Seymour carried only eight states, but ran fairly well in many others, especially in the South.

The election showed that despite his popularity as a military hero, Grant was not invincible. His margin of victory came from newly enfranchised southern freedmen, who supplied him with about , votes.

The Democrats had named a weak ticket and attacked Reconstruction rather than pursuing economic issues, but revealed surprising strength.

Greeley headed an uneasy coalition of Democrats and liberal Republicans. Gratz Brown of Missouri. Disaffected by Grant administration corruption and the controversy over Reconstruction, Greeley ran on a platform of civil service reform, laissez-faire liberalism, and an end to Reconstruction.

The Republicans came out for civil service reform and the protection of black rights. The electoral college vote was to Actually, the result was more anti-Greeley than pro-Grant.

In the Republican party nominated Rutherford B. Hayes of Ohio for president and William A. Wheeler of New York for vice president. The Democratic candidates were Samuel J.

Tilden of New York for president and Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana for vice president. Several minor parties, including the Prohibition party and the Greenback party, also ran candidates.

The country was growing weary of Reconstruction policies, which kept federal troops stationed in several southern states.

Moreover, the Grant administration was tainted by numerous scandals, which caused disaffection for the party among voters. In the House of Representatives had gone Democratic; political change was in the air.

Samuel Tilden won the popular vote, receiving 4,, votes to 4,, for Hayes. In the electoral college Tilden was also ahead to ; both parties claimed the remaining 20 votes.

The Democrats needed only 1 more vote to capture the presidency, but the Republicans needed all 20 contested electoral votes.

Nineteen of them came from South Carolina, Louisiana, and Florida—states that the Republicans still controlled.

Protesting Democratic treatment of black voters, Republicans insisted that Hayes had carried those states but that Democratic electors had voted for Tilden.

Two sets of election returns existed—one from the Democrats, one from the Republicans. Congress had to determine the authenticity of the disputed returns.

Unable to decide, legislators established a fifteen-member commission composed of ten congressmen and five Supreme Court justices.

The commission was supposed to be nonpartisan, but ultimately it consisted of eight Republicans and seven Democrats. The final decision was to be rendered by the commission unless both the Senate and the House rejected it.

The commission accepted the Republican vote in each state. The House disagreed, but the Senate concurred, and Hayes and Wheeler were declared president and vice president.

The election of was as rich in partisan wrangling as it was lacking in major issues. Blaine resulted in a convention in which neither Blaine nor the Stalwart choice, former president Ulysses S.

Grant, could gain the nomination. On the thirty-sixth ballot, a compromise choice, Senator James A. Garfield of Ohio, was nominated.

In their platforms, both parties equivocated on the currency issue and unenthusiastically endorsed civil service reform, while supporting generous pensions for veterans and the exclusion of Chinese immigrants.

Turnout was high on election day Greenback-Labor candidate James Weaver garnered , votes. Outside the southern and border states, Hancock carried only New Jersey, Nevada , and 5 of 6 California electoral votes.

This race, marred by negative campaigning and corruption, ended in the election of the first Democratic president since The Republicans split into three camps: Grant supporters who had fought civil service reform; and Half-Breeds, moderate reformers and high-tariff men loyal to the party.

The Republicans nominated James G. His running mate was one of his opponents, Senator John Logan of Illinois. This gave Democrats a chance to name a ticket popular in New York, where Stalwart senator Roscoe Conkling had a long-running feud with Blaine, and they took advantage of it.

They chose New York governor Grover Cleveland , a fiscal conservative and civil service reformer, for president and Senator Thomas Hendricks of Indiana for vice president.

The campaign was vicious. Gone to the White House, Ha! Thurman of Ohio as his running mate, replacing Vice President Thomas Hendricks who had died in office.

Morton of New York was the vice-presidential nominee. The campaign of helped establish the Republicans as the party of high tariffs, which most Democrats, heavily supported by southern farmers, opposed.

But memories of the Civil War also figured heavily in the election. Morton with Whitelaw Reid of New York. The Democrats also selected the familiar: Weaver of Iowa and James G.

The main difference between the Republicans and the Democrats in was their position on the tariff. The Republicans supported ever-increasing rates, whereas a substantial wing of the Democratic party pushed through a platform plank that demanded import taxes for revenue only.

The Populists called for government ownership of the railroads and monetary reform, confronting these issues in a way the two major parties did not.

Weaver and the Populists received 1,, His running mate was Garret A. Hobart of New Jersey. The Democratic party platform was critical of President Grover Cleveland and endorsed the coinage of silver at a ratio of sixteen to one.

His running mate was Arthur Sewall of Maine. Palmer of Illinois for president and Simon B. Buckner of Kentucky for vice president.

Bryan toured the country, stressing his support for silver coinage as a solution for economically disadvantaged American farmers and calling for a relaxation of credit and regulation of the railroads.

McKinley remained at home and underscored the Republican commitment to the gold standard and protectionism.

The Republican campaign, heavily financed by corporate interests, successfully portrayed Bryan and the Populists as radicals. The electoral college votes were to Bryan did not carry any northern industrial states, and the agricultural states of Iowa, Minnesota , and North Dakota also went Republican.

Since Vice President Garret A. Hobart had died in office, Governor Theodore Roosevelt of New York received the vice-presidential nomination.

Stevenson of Illinois for vice president. Delivering over six hundred speeches in twenty-four states, he also persisted in his crusade for the free coinage of silver.

McKinley did not actively campaign, relying on the revival of the economy that had occurred during his first term. In the election McKinley won wide support from business interests.

Foreign policy questions proved unimportant to most voters. In the electoral college the vote was to This race confirmed the popularity of Theodore Roosevelt, who had become president when McKinley was assassinated, and moved Democrats away from bimetallism and toward progressivism.

Some Republicans deemed Roosevelt too liberal and flirted with nominating Marcus A. But the party easily nominated Roosevelt for a term in his own right and Senator Charles Fairbanks of Indiana for vice president.

Democrats divided again over gold and silver, but this time gold won out. Parker and his campaign attacked Roosevelt for his antitrust policies and for accepting contributions from big business.

His having invited Booker T. Washington for a meal at the White House was also used against him. William Jennings Bryan overcame his distaste for Parker and his supporters and campaigned in the Midwest and West for the ticket.

Playing down bimetallism, he stressed moving the party toward more progressive stances. He carried the electoral college, to , with only the South going Democratic.

The predominant campaign issue was Roosevelt. Business leaders campaigned for Taft. In , angered over what he felt was the betrayal of his policies by his hand-picked successor, President William Howard Taft, former president Theodore Roosevelt sought the Republican nomination.

His running mate was Governor Hiram Johnson of California. Marshall of Indiana for vice president.

For the fourth time the Socialist party nominated Eugene V. During the campaign Roosevelt and Wilson attracted most of the attention.

They offered the voters two brands of progressivism. In the Progressive party convention tried to nominate Theodore Roosevelt again, but Roosevelt, seeking to reunify the Republicans, convinced the convention to support the Republican choice, Associate Justice Charles Evans Hughes.

Parker of Louisiana for vice president. The Democrats stressed the fact that Wilson had kept the nation out of the European war, but Wilson was ambiguous about his ability to continue to do so.

The election was close. Wilson also obtained a slim margin in the electoral college, winning to

Presidential election us -

Es ist die Erwachsenen in den USA. Paul Ryan Is Running for President. Es gab bis zum Vier Wochen nach Amtsantritt und damit fast vier Jahre vor der nächsten Wahl hielt Trump seine erste Wahlkampfveranstaltung ab [5] und ist seitdem in einigen der Staaten aufgetreten, die ihm zum Wahlsieg verholfen hatten. This page was last edited on 1 October , at Kein unabhängiger Kandidat konnte theoretisch die Mehrheit der Wahlmännerstimmen gewinnen.

us presidential election -

Dies sind ungebundene Delegierte, die für einen Kandidaten ihrer Wahl stimmen können. Rick Santorum drops presidential bid, endorses Marco Rubio. Entgegen diesem am 8. Präsidentschaftswahlen in den Vereinigten Staaten. Bush hatte die Präsidentschaftswahl mit einer bis heute umstrittenen Differenz von Stimmen in Florida gewonnen. State and Local Government Like the national government, state governments have three branches: The Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution provides the procedure by which the President and Vice President are elected, which is through the Electoral College , so the national popular vote does not determine the outcome of the United States presidential election. The New York Times, 7.

Presidential Election Us Video

2008 Presidential Election Results Thurman of Download casino king part 1 comic 8 as his casino deluxe emmendingen öffnungszeiten mate, replacing Vice President Thomas Hendricks who had died in office. Third parties have taken second place only twice, in and After learning the divorce had not yet been ronaldo messi vergleich final, the couple held a second, valid wedding. In addition, the Twelfth Amendment establishes that the Vice-President must meet all of the casino austria damentag of being a President. Overall, she is beating Trump la dispute quotes 71 percent to 22 percent among all non-white voters. After winning the June 5 primaries in California and several other states, Romney had received more than enough pledged delegates to clinch the nomination without counting unpledged delegates, making the June 26 Utah Primary, the last contest of play slots for free cycle, purely symbolic. In total, Jackson received electoral votes. Greeley betwaycasino an uneasy coalition of Democrats and liberal Juventus bayern münchen. Any candidate can online casino bonus offers for a recount if the margin is within 20 percent. Nixon received 31, popular votes to 30, for Humphrey and 9, for Wallace. Donald Trump wurde am The New Republic Bisher haben auf Seite der Republikaner der amtierende März englisch, Die unterschiedliche und zwischen den einzelnen Riz casino abweichende Datenlage bzw. We hope online casinos giropay compete in all 50 states. Präsidenten der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika ermittelt. Retrieved 16 November Der Tagesspiegel vom Auch soll Pence durch seine als ruhig und sachlich beschriebene Persönlichkeit Trumps extrovertiertes Auftreten ausgleichen sowie evangelikale Wähler ansprechen, die Presidential election us skeptisch gegenüber stehen, aber einen wichtigen Teil der casino spiele de Wählerschaft bilden. Russische Einflussnahme auf den Wahlkampf in den Vereinigten Staaten The New York Times, 7. As the number of states increased and the population grew, the number of representatives increased significantly. Zudem gab es eine Reihe von unabhängigen Kandidaten. Republikaner befürchteten eine ähnlich deutliche Niederlage wie Barry Goldwater. Dezember , Peter Welchering: In anderen Projekten Commons. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Die Präsidentschaftswahl in den Vereinigten Staaten ist für den 3. Präsidenten sowie Mike Pence mit Stimmen zum Diese kam zu dem Ergebnis, dass kein Parteimitglied besser als Cheney selbst für das Amt geeignet sei. Januar ist der Wahltag der Dienstag nach dem ersten Montag im November, [1] im Jahr also der 3. Ich habe nur gezeigt, dass es die Bombe gibt Als grundlegendes Dilemma Clintons beschreibt die Untersuchung, an sie werde der Anspruch gestellt, sich maskuliner zu geben, um für eine Führungsrolle in Betracht zu kommen. Vizepräsident Joe Biden , der sich schon um eine Präsidentschaftskandidatur bemüht hatte, schloss ein erneutes Antreten im Oktober aus. Dieser erfüllte lediglich eine Platzhalterfunktion , die daraus resultiert, dass in vielen Staaten eine Kandidatur nur gültig ist, wenn sie frühzeitig eine Nominierung für die Vizepräsidentschaft enthält. Die Worte hatten wenige Silben. Sieben Wahlmänner mit abweichenden Stimmen gab es im Electoral College noch nie. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte.

Disaffected by Grant administration corruption and the controversy over Reconstruction, Greeley ran on a platform of civil service reform, laissez-faire liberalism, and an end to Reconstruction.

The Republicans came out for civil service reform and the protection of black rights. The electoral college vote was to Actually, the result was more anti-Greeley than pro-Grant.

In the Republican party nominated Rutherford B. Hayes of Ohio for president and William A. Wheeler of New York for vice president. The Democratic candidates were Samuel J.

Tilden of New York for president and Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana for vice president. Several minor parties, including the Prohibition party and the Greenback party, also ran candidates.

The country was growing weary of Reconstruction policies, which kept federal troops stationed in several southern states.

Moreover, the Grant administration was tainted by numerous scandals, which caused disaffection for the party among voters.

In the House of Representatives had gone Democratic; political change was in the air. Samuel Tilden won the popular vote, receiving 4,, votes to 4,, for Hayes.

In the electoral college Tilden was also ahead to ; both parties claimed the remaining 20 votes. The Democrats needed only 1 more vote to capture the presidency, but the Republicans needed all 20 contested electoral votes.

Nineteen of them came from South Carolina, Louisiana, and Florida—states that the Republicans still controlled. Protesting Democratic treatment of black voters, Republicans insisted that Hayes had carried those states but that Democratic electors had voted for Tilden.

Two sets of election returns existed—one from the Democrats, one from the Republicans. Congress had to determine the authenticity of the disputed returns.

Unable to decide, legislators established a fifteen-member commission composed of ten congressmen and five Supreme Court justices.

The commission was supposed to be nonpartisan, but ultimately it consisted of eight Republicans and seven Democrats. The final decision was to be rendered by the commission unless both the Senate and the House rejected it.

The commission accepted the Republican vote in each state. The House disagreed, but the Senate concurred, and Hayes and Wheeler were declared president and vice president.

The election of was as rich in partisan wrangling as it was lacking in major issues. Blaine resulted in a convention in which neither Blaine nor the Stalwart choice, former president Ulysses S.

Grant, could gain the nomination. On the thirty-sixth ballot, a compromise choice, Senator James A. Garfield of Ohio, was nominated. In their platforms, both parties equivocated on the currency issue and unenthusiastically endorsed civil service reform, while supporting generous pensions for veterans and the exclusion of Chinese immigrants.

Turnout was high on election day Greenback-Labor candidate James Weaver garnered , votes. Outside the southern and border states, Hancock carried only New Jersey, Nevada , and 5 of 6 California electoral votes.

This race, marred by negative campaigning and corruption, ended in the election of the first Democratic president since The Republicans split into three camps: Grant supporters who had fought civil service reform; and Half-Breeds, moderate reformers and high-tariff men loyal to the party.

The Republicans nominated James G. His running mate was one of his opponents, Senator John Logan of Illinois. This gave Democrats a chance to name a ticket popular in New York, where Stalwart senator Roscoe Conkling had a long-running feud with Blaine, and they took advantage of it.

They chose New York governor Grover Cleveland , a fiscal conservative and civil service reformer, for president and Senator Thomas Hendricks of Indiana for vice president.

The campaign was vicious. Gone to the White House, Ha! Thurman of Ohio as his running mate, replacing Vice President Thomas Hendricks who had died in office.

Morton of New York was the vice-presidential nominee. The campaign of helped establish the Republicans as the party of high tariffs, which most Democrats, heavily supported by southern farmers, opposed.

But memories of the Civil War also figured heavily in the election. Morton with Whitelaw Reid of New York. The Democrats also selected the familiar: Weaver of Iowa and James G.

The main difference between the Republicans and the Democrats in was their position on the tariff. The Republicans supported ever-increasing rates, whereas a substantial wing of the Democratic party pushed through a platform plank that demanded import taxes for revenue only.

The Populists called for government ownership of the railroads and monetary reform, confronting these issues in a way the two major parties did not.

Weaver and the Populists received 1,, His running mate was Garret A. Hobart of New Jersey. The Democratic party platform was critical of President Grover Cleveland and endorsed the coinage of silver at a ratio of sixteen to one.

His running mate was Arthur Sewall of Maine. Palmer of Illinois for president and Simon B. Buckner of Kentucky for vice president.

Bryan toured the country, stressing his support for silver coinage as a solution for economically disadvantaged American farmers and calling for a relaxation of credit and regulation of the railroads.

McKinley remained at home and underscored the Republican commitment to the gold standard and protectionism.

The Republican campaign, heavily financed by corporate interests, successfully portrayed Bryan and the Populists as radicals. The electoral college votes were to Bryan did not carry any northern industrial states, and the agricultural states of Iowa, Minnesota , and North Dakota also went Republican.

Since Vice President Garret A. Hobart had died in office, Governor Theodore Roosevelt of New York received the vice-presidential nomination. Stevenson of Illinois for vice president.

Delivering over six hundred speeches in twenty-four states, he also persisted in his crusade for the free coinage of silver. McKinley did not actively campaign, relying on the revival of the economy that had occurred during his first term.

In the election McKinley won wide support from business interests. Foreign policy questions proved unimportant to most voters.

In the electoral college the vote was to This race confirmed the popularity of Theodore Roosevelt, who had become president when McKinley was assassinated, and moved Democrats away from bimetallism and toward progressivism.

Some Republicans deemed Roosevelt too liberal and flirted with nominating Marcus A. But the party easily nominated Roosevelt for a term in his own right and Senator Charles Fairbanks of Indiana for vice president.

Democrats divided again over gold and silver, but this time gold won out. Parker and his campaign attacked Roosevelt for his antitrust policies and for accepting contributions from big business.

His having invited Booker T. Washington for a meal at the White House was also used against him. William Jennings Bryan overcame his distaste for Parker and his supporters and campaigned in the Midwest and West for the ticket.

Playing down bimetallism, he stressed moving the party toward more progressive stances. He carried the electoral college, to , with only the South going Democratic.

The predominant campaign issue was Roosevelt. Business leaders campaigned for Taft. In , angered over what he felt was the betrayal of his policies by his hand-picked successor, President William Howard Taft, former president Theodore Roosevelt sought the Republican nomination.

His running mate was Governor Hiram Johnson of California. Marshall of Indiana for vice president.

For the fourth time the Socialist party nominated Eugene V. During the campaign Roosevelt and Wilson attracted most of the attention. They offered the voters two brands of progressivism.

In the Progressive party convention tried to nominate Theodore Roosevelt again, but Roosevelt, seeking to reunify the Republicans, convinced the convention to support the Republican choice, Associate Justice Charles Evans Hughes.

Parker of Louisiana for vice president. The Democrats stressed the fact that Wilson had kept the nation out of the European war, but Wilson was ambiguous about his ability to continue to do so.

The election was close. Wilson also obtained a slim margin in the electoral college, winning to After a generation of progressive insurgency within the Republican party, it returned in to a conservative stance.

Harding of Ohio, a political insider. Governor Calvin Coolidge of Massachusetts, best known for his tough handling of the Boston police strike of , was the vice-presidential nominee.

The Democratic party nominated James M. Cox, governor of Ohio, and Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York, assistant secretary of the navy in the Wilson administration.

The Socialist party nominated Eugene V. A bedridden Wilson hoped the election would be a referendum on his League of Nations, but that issue was probably not decisive.

In the electoral college only the South went for Cox. Harding won by to Although still in prison, Debs received more than , votes. Harding had died in La Follette for president.

The new Progressive party chose Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Montana for vice president. The platform called for higher taxes on the wealthy, conservation, direct election of the president, and the ending of child labor.

In choosing their candidates the Democrats were faced with polar opposites. Smith of New York was the epitome of the urban machine politician, and he was also Catholic; William G.

McAdoo was a Protestant popular in the South and West. A deadlock developed; on the rd ballot the delegates finally settled on John W.

Davis, a corporation lawyer, and Charles W. Bryan of Nebraska, the brother of William Jennings Bryan.

La Follette carried only his home state, Wisconsin , with 13 electoral votes. Charles Curtis of Kansas was his running mate.

The Democrats nominated Alfred E. Hoover firmly supported Prohibition, whereas Smith, an avowed wet, favored repeal.

Many Americans found the urban and cultural groups that the cigar-smoking Smith epitomized frightening; Hoover seemed to stand for old-fashioned rural values.

The election produced a high voter turnout. Although Hoover had tried to respond to the crisis, his belief in voluntarism limited his options. The Democratic party nominated Franklin D.

The platform called for the repeal of Prohibition and a reduction in federal spending. During the campaign Hoover defended his record, his commitment to a balanced budget, and the gold standard—a backward-looking stance, given that the number of unemployed stood at 13 million.

Roosevelt made few specific proposals, but his tone and demeanor were positive and forward-looking. The Democrats won the election in a landslide.

In the Democratic party nominated President Franklin D. Landon of Kansas and Fred Knox of Illinois.

The presidential campaign focused on class to an unusual extent for American politics. Conservative Democrats such as Alfred E.

Eighty percent of newspapers endorsed the Republicans, accusing Roosevelt of imposing a centralized economy. But Roosevelt appealed to a coalition of western and southern farmers, industrial workers, urban ethnic voters, and reform-minded intellectuals.

African-American voters, historically Republican, switched to fdr in record numbers. In a referendum on the emerging welfare state, the Democratic party won in a landslide—27,, popular votes for fdr to only 16,, for Landon.

The Republicans carried two states—Maine and Vermont—for 8 electoral votes; Roosevelt received the remaining The unprecedented success of fdr in marked the beginning of a long period of Democratic party dominance.

In President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term by a margin of nearly 5 million: The president carried the electoral college, to The new vice president was Secretary of Agriculture Henry A.

Wallace, chosen by the Democrats to replace the two-term vice president John Nance Garner who no longer agreed with Roosevelt about anything.

McNary was the Republican candidate for vice president. This fact had determined the Republican choice of Willkie, who was a liberal internationalist running as the candidate of a conservative isolationist party.

Although Willkie did not disagree with Roosevelt on foreign policy, the country chose to stay with an experienced leader.

Roosevelt planned to run for a fourth term, and this shaped the coming campaign. Democratic party regulars disliked Vice President Henry A.

Wallace; eventually they persuaded Roosevelt to replace him with Senator Harry S. Although Wendell Willkie, the nominee in , was initially the front-runner in the Republican race, the party returned to its traditional base, choosing conservative governor Thomas E.

Dewey of New York. Republicans had hoped that Governor Earl Warren of California would accept the vice-presidential nomination, but he declined. The party then turned to John W.

The president won reelection with results that were similar to those of Roosevelt was the issue in At issue also was whether any president should serve four terms.

The Democrats and the president were vulnerable on all these points, but the American people once again chose the familiar in a time of crisis: Truman, who had succeeded President Roosevelt after his death in , stood for reelection on the Democratic ticket with Alben Barkley of Kentucky as his running mate.

A new left-leaning Progressive party nominated former vice president Henry A. Wallace of Iowa for president with Glen Taylor, a senator from Idaho , as his running mate.

The Republican slate consisted of two prominent governors: Although polls and conventional wisdom predicted a Dewey victory, Truman campaigned vigorously as the underdog, making a famous whistle-stop tour of the country aboard a special train.

Results were uncertain to the last minute. A well-known photograph shows Truman the day after the election smiling broadly and holding aloft a newspaper with the headline dewey wins!

The paper was wrong: Truman had received 24,, popular votes, or Thurmond and Wallace each received about 1. The Democratic victory in the electoral college was more substantial: Truman beat Dewey to ; Thurmond received 39 votes, and Wallace none.

When President Harry S. Truman declined to run for a third term, the Democratic convention nominated Governor Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois for president on the third ballot.

Senator John Sparkman of Alabama was chosen as his running mate. The Republican fight for the nomination was a conflict between the isolationists, represented by Senator Robert Taft of Ohio, and the more liberal internationalists, who backed World War II general Dwight D.

Eisenhower , then president of Columbia University. Eisenhower won the nomination. Nixon , an anticommunist senator from California, was the vice-presidential candidate.

Despite suffering a heart attack and abdominal surgery during his first term, President Dwight D. Eisenhower was nominated by the Republicans for a second term without opposition.

Nixon had been a controversial vice president and many Republicans felt he was a liability, he was also renominated. For the second time the Democrats chose former governor Adlai E.

Stevenson of Illinois; his running mate was Estes Kefauver of Tennessee. Foreign policy dominated the campaign. The Suez Canal crisis, occurring in the final weeks of the campaign, created a sense of emergency, and the country responded by voting strongly against change.

His margin was to 73 in the electoral college. In the Democratic party nominated John F. Kennedy , a senator from Massachusetts, for president.

Johnson of Texas was his running mate. Nixon to succeed Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was prohibited from running for a third term by the recently adopted Twenty-second Amendment.

Kennedy was Catholic, and though religion was not a major issue, it had considerable influence on many voters.

Kennedy was the first Catholic and the youngest person to be elected president. The Democrats nominated Lyndon B. Johnson who had succeeded to the presidency upon the assassination of President John F.

Johnson, the first president from the South since Andrew Johnson, had been Democratic leader of the Senate. Miller of New York for vice president.

In the campaign, conducted in the midst of the escalating Vietnam War , Goldwater, an ultraconservative, called for the bombing of North Vietnam and implied that the Social Security system should be dismantled.

Johnson won a decisive victory, polling 43,, popular votes to 27,, for Goldwater. The Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and protests tied to both combined in a tumultuous year to cause a tight, unusual election closely linked to these issues.

Kennedy of New York, both with strong support from liberal constituencies. Johnson announced that he would not seek reelection.

This prompted Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey to announce his candidacy. Kennedy won the California primary, but immediately thereafter, he was assassinated by Sirhan Sirhan.

Humphrey then pulled ahead and was nominated for president, with Senator Edmund Muskie of Maine for vice president.

The party convention in Chicago was marred by bloody clashes between antiwar protesters and the local police. In comparison, the Republican race was less complicated.

Former vice president Richard M. Nixon completed his political comeback by winning the presidential nomination.

He chose Governor Spiro Agnew of Maryland as his running mate. Wallace was highly critical of Supreme Court decisions that had broadened the Bill of Rights and of Great Society programs to rebuild the inner cities and enforce civil rights for blacks.

Nixon received 31,, popular votes to 30,, for Humphrey and 9,, for Wallace. In the Republicans nominated President Richard M.

Nixon and Vice President Spiro Agnew. Eagleton of Missouri was the vice-presidential choice, but after it was revealed that he had once received electric shock and other psychiatric treatments, he resigned from the ticket.

The campaign focused on the prospect of peace in Vietnam and an upsurge in the economy. Unemployment had leveled off and the inflation rate was declining.

Two weeks before the November election, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger predicted inaccurately that the war in Vietnam would soon be over.

During the campaign, a break-in occurred at Democratic National Headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington, D.

Only Massachusetts gave its votes to McGovern. In the Democratic party nominated former governor Jimmy Carter of Georgia for president and Senator Walter Mondale of Minnesota for vice president.

Nixon had appointed Ford, a congressman from Michigan, as vice president to replace Spiro Agnew, who had resigned amid charges of corruption.

Ford became president when Nixon resigned after the House Judiciary Committee voted three articles of impeachment because of his involvement in an attempted cover-up of the politically inspired Watergate break-in.

In the campaign, Carter ran as an outsider, independent of Washington, which was now in disrepute. Ford tried to justify his pardoning Nixon for any crimes he might have committed during the cover-up, as well as to overcome the disgrace many thought the Republicans had brought to the presidency.

Carter and Mondale won a narrow victory, 40,, popular votes to 39,, and electoral votes to The Democratic victory ended eight years of divided government; the party now controlled both the White House and Congress.

But Carter easily won the nomination at the Democratic convention. The party also renominated Walter Mondale for vice president.

Ronald Reagan , former governor of California, received the Republican nomination, and his chief challenger, George Bush , became the vice-presidential nominee.

Anderson of Illinois, who had also sought the nomination, ran as an independent with Patrick J. Lucey, former Democratic governor of Wisconsin, as his running mate.

The two major issues of the campaign were the economy and the Iranian hostage crisis. President Carter seemed unable to control inflation and had not succeeded in obtaining the release of American hostages in Tehran before the election.

Reagan won a landslide victory, and Republicans also gained control of the Senate for the first time in twenty-five years. Reagan received 43,, popular votes in the election, and Carter, 35,, John Anderson won no electoral votes, but got 5,, popular votes.

Jackson, an African-American, sought to move the party to the left. This was the first time a major party nominated a woman for one of the top offices.

In the electoral college the count was Reagan, , and Mondale, He chose Senator Dan Quayle of Indiana as his running mate.

Hart withdrew from the race following revelations about an extramarital affair, and party regulars and political pundits perceived Jackson, a liberal and an African-American, as unlikely to win the general election.

Once again the Republicans were in the enviable situation of running during a time of relative tranquillity and economic stability.

After a campaign featuring controversial television ads, Bush and Quayle won 48,, popular votes to 41,, for Dukakis and Bentsen and carried the electoral college, to In incumbent President George H.

But by , his ratings had sunk, and Bush became the fourth sitting U. In the summer of Ross Perot led the polls with 39 percent of voter support.

Although Perot came in a distant third, he was still the most successful third-party candidate since Theodore Roosevelt in Although Clinton won a decisive victory, he carried a mere four Southern states, signaling a decline in Southern support for Democrats who historically could count on the area as an electoral stronghold.

Later, in the elections of and , Democrats did not carry a single Southern state. The election was the most lavishly funded up to that point.

During this election the Democratic National Committee was accused of accepting donations from Chinese contributors. Non-American citizens are forbidden by law from donating to U.

The election was the fourth election in U. It was the first such election since , when Benjamin Harris became president after winning more electoral votes but losing the popular vote to Grover Cleveland.

Gore conceded on election night but retracted his concession the next day when he learned that the vote in Florida was too close to call.

Florida began a recount, but the U. Supreme Court eventually ruled the recount unconstitutional. Political activist Ralph Nader ran on the Green Party ticket and captured 2.

Total voter turnout for the presidential election numbered at about million, an impressive 15 million increase from the vote. After the bitterly contested election of , many were poised for a similar election battle in The nomination process, consisting of the primary elections and caucuses and the nominating conventions , was not specified in the Constitution, but was developed over time by the states and political parties.

These primary elections are generally held between January and June before the general election in November, while the nominating conventions are held in the summer.

Though not codified by law, political parties also follow an indirect election process, where voters in the 50 U. Each party may then choose a vice presidential running mate to join the ticket, which is either determined by choice of the nominee or by a second round of voting.

Because of changes to national campaign finance laws since the s regarding the disclosure of contributions for federal campaigns, presidential candidates from the major political parties usually declare their intentions to run as early as the spring of the previous calendar year before the election almost 18 months before Inauguration Day.

Article Two of the United States Constitution originally established the method of presidential elections, including the Electoral College.

This was a result of a compromise between those constitutional framers who wanted the Congress to choose the president, and those who preferred a national popular vote.

Each state is allocated a number of electors that is equal to the size of its delegation in both houses of Congress combined. With the ratification of the 23rd Amendment to the Constitution in , the District of Columbia is also granted a number of electors, equal to the number of those held by the least populous state.

Constitutionally, the manner for choosing electors is determined within each state by its legislature. During the first presidential election in , only 6 of the 13 original states chose electors by any form of popular vote.

Under the original system established by Article Two, electors could cast two votes to two different candidates for president.

The candidate with the highest number of votes provided it was a majority of the electoral votes became the president, and the second-place candidate became the vice president.

This presented a problem during the presidential election of when Aaron Burr received the same number of electoral votes as Thomas Jefferson and challenged Jefferson's election to the office.

In the end, Jefferson was chosen as the president because of Alexander Hamilton 's influence in the House of Representatives.

In response to the election, the 12th Amendment was passed, requiring electors to cast two distinct votes: While this solved the problem at hand, it ultimately had the effect of lowering the prestige of the Vice Presidency, as the office was no longer for the leading challenger for the Presidency.

The separate ballots for President and Vice President became something of a moot issue later in the 19th century when it became the norm for popular elections to determine a state's Electoral College delegation.

Electors chosen this way are pledged to vote for a particular presidential and vice presidential candidate offered by the same political party.

So, while the Constitution says that the President and Vice President are chosen separately, in practice they are chosen together.

The 12th Amendment also established rules when no candidate wins a majority vote in the Electoral College.

In the presidential election of , Andrew Jackson received a plurality , but not a majority, of electoral votes cast. The election was thrown to the House of Representatives , and John Quincy Adams was elected to the presidency.

A deep rivalry resulted between Andrew Jackson and House Speaker Henry Clay , who had also been a candidate in the election.

Since , aside from the occasional "faithless elector," the popular vote determines the winner of a presidential election by determining the electoral vote, as each state or district's popular vote determines its electoral college vote.

Although the nationwide popular vote does not directly determine the winner of a presidential election, it does strongly correlate with who is the victor.

In 53 of the 58 total elections held so far about 91 percent , the winner of the national popular vote has also carried the Electoral College vote.

The winners of the nationwide popular vote and the Electoral College vote differ only in close elections. In highly competitive elections, candidates focus on turning out their vote in the contested swing states critical to winning an electoral college majority, so they do not try to maximize their popular vote by real or fraudulent vote increases in one-party areas.

However, candidates can fail to get the most votes in the nationwide popular vote in a Presidential election and still win that election.

In the election, Jackson won the popular vote, but no one received the majority of electoral votes. According to the 12th Amendment in the Constitution, the House of Representatives must choose the president out of the top 3 people in the election.

Clay had come fourth, so he threw his support to Adams, who then won. Because Adams later named Clay his Secretary of State, Jackson's supporters claimed that Adams gained the presidency by making a deal with Clay.

Charges of a "corrupt bargain" followed Adams through his term. Then in , , , and , the winner of electoral vote lost the popular vote outright.

Numerous constitutional amendments have been submitted seeking to replace the Electoral College with a direct popular vote, but none has ever successfully passed both Houses of Congress.

Another alternate proposal is the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact , an interstate compact whereby individual participating states agree to allocate their electors based on the winner of the national popular vote instead of just their respective statewide results.

The presidential election day was established on a Tuesday in the month of November because of the factors involved weather, harvests and worship.

When voters used to travel to the polls by horse, Tuesday was an ideal day because it allowed people to worship on Sunday, ride to their county seat on Monday, and vote on Tuesday—all before market day, Wednesday.

The month of November also fits nicely between harvest time and harsh winter weather, which could be especially bad to people traveling by horse and buggy.

Until , presidents were not sworn in until March 4 because it took so long to count and report ballots, and because of the winner's logistical issues of moving to the capital.

With better technology and the 20th Amendment being passed, presidential inaugurations were moved to noon on January 20—allowing presidents to start their duties sooner.

The Federal Election Campaign Act of was enacted to increase disclosure of contributions for federal campaigns. Thus, this began a trend of presidential candidates declaring their intentions to run as early as the Spring of the previous calendar year so they can start raising and spending the money needed for their nationwide campaign.

The first president, George Washington , was elected as an independent. Since the election of his successor, John Adams , in , all winners of U.

Third parties have taken second place only twice, in and The last time a third independent candidate achieved significant success although still finishing in third place was in , and the last time a third-party candidate received any electoral votes not from faithless electors was in Article Two of the United States Constitution stipulates that for a person to serve as President, the individual must be a natural-born citizen of the United States , at least 35 years old, and a resident of the United States for a period of no less than 14 years.

A candidate may start running his or her campaign early before turning 35 years old or completing 14 years of residency, but must meet the age and residency requirements by Inauguration Day.

The Twenty-second Amendment to the Constitution also sets a term limit: Constitution also has two provisions that apply to all federal offices in general, not just the presidency.

Article I, Section 3, Clause 7 states that if the U. Congress convicts any officer on impeachment, they may also bar that person from holding any public office in the future.

And Section 3 of the Fourteenth Amendment prohibits the election to any federal office of any person who had held any federal or state office and then engaged in insurrection, rebellion or treason; this disqualification can be waived if such an individual gains the consent of two-thirds of both houses of Congress.

In addition, the Twelfth Amendment establishes that the Vice-President must meet all of the qualifications of being a President. The modern nominating process of U.

This process was never included in the United States Constitution , and thus evolved over time by the political parties to clear the field of candidates.

The primary elections are run by state and local governments, while the caucuses are organized directly by the political parties.

Some states hold only primary elections, some hold only caucuses, and others use a combination of both. These primaries and caucuses are staggered generally between January and June before the federal election, with Iowa and New Hampshire traditionally holding the first presidential state caucus and primary, respectively.

Like the general election, presidential caucuses or primaries are indirect elections. The major political parties officially vote for their presidential candidate at their respective nominating conventions, usually all held in the summer before the federal election.

Depending on each state's law and state's political party rules, when voters cast ballots for a candidate in a presidential caucus or primary, they may be voting to award delegates "bound" to vote for a candidate at the presidential nominating conventions, or they may simply be expressing an opinion that the state party is not bound to follow in selecting delegates to their respective national convention.

Unlike the general election, voters in the U. Furthermore, each political party can determine how many delegates to allocate to each state and territory.

In for example, the Democratic and Republican party conventions each used two different formulas to allocate delegates. The Democrats-based theirs on two main factors: Along with delegates chosen during primaries and caucuses, state and U.

For Republicans, they consist of the three top party officials from each state and territory. Democrats have a more expansive group of unpledged delegates called " superdelegates ", who are party leaders and elected officials.

Each party's presidential candidate also chooses a vice presidential nominee to run with him or her on the same ticket , and this choice is rubber-stamped by the convention.

If no single candidate has secured a majority of delegates including both pledged and unpledged , then a " brokered convention " results.

All pledged delegates are then "released" and are able to switch their allegiance to a different candidate. Thereafter, the nomination is decided through a process of alternating political horse trading , and additional rounds of re-votes.

The conventions have historically been held inside convention centers , but since the late 20th century both the Democratic and Republican parties have favored sports arenas and domed stadiums to accommodate the increasing attendance.

Under the United States Constitution, the manner of choosing electors for the Electoral College is determined by each state's legislature.

Although each state designates electors by popular vote, other methods are allowed. For instance, instead of having a popular vote, a number of states used to select presidential electors by a direct vote of the state legislature itself.

However, federal law does specify that all electors must be selected on the same day, which is "the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November," i.

Thus, the presidential election is really an amalgamation of separate and simultaneous state elections instead of a single national election run by the federal government.

Like any other election in the United States, the eligibility of an individual for voting is set out in the Constitution and regulated at state level.

The Constitution states that suffrage cannot be denied on grounds of race or color , sex or age for citizens eighteen years or older.

Beyond these basic qualifications, it is the responsibility of state legislatures to regulate voter eligibility. Generally, voters are required to vote on a ballot where they select the candidate of their choice.

The presidential ballot is a vote "for the electors of a candidate" meaning that the voter is not voting for the candidate, but endorsing a slate of electors pledged to vote for a specific presidential and vice presidential candidate.

Many voting ballots allow a voter to "blanket vote" for all candidates in a particular political party or to select individual candidates on a line by line voting system.

Which candidates appear on the voting ticket is determined through a legal process known as ballot access. Usually, the size of the candidate's political party and the results of the major nomination conventions determine who is pre-listed on the presidential ballot.

Thus, the presidential election ticket will not list every candidate running for President, but only those who have secured a major party nomination or whose size of their political party warrants having been formally listed.

Laws are in effect to have other candidates pre-listed on a ticket, provided that enough voters have endorsed the candidate, usually through a signature list.

The final way to be elected for president is to have one's name written in at the time of election as a write-in candidate. This is used for candidates who did not fulfill the legal requirements to be pre-listed on the voting ticket.

It is also used by voters to express a distaste for the listed candidates, by writing in an alternative candidate for president such as Mickey Mouse or comedian Stephen Colbert whose application was voted down by the South Carolina Democratic Party.

In any event, a write-in candidate has never won an election for President of the United States. Guam has held straw polls for president since the election to draw attention to this fact.

Most state laws establish a winner-take-all system, wherein the ticket that wins a plurality of votes wins all of that state's allocated electoral votes, and thus has their slate of electors chosen to vote in the Electoral College.

Maine and Nebraska do not use this method, instead giving two electoral votes to the statewide winner and one electoral vote to the winner of each Congressional district.

Each state's winning slate of electors then meets at their respective state's capital on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December to cast their electoral votes on separate ballots for President and Vice President.

Although Electoral College members can technically vote for anyone under the U. Constitution, 24 states have laws to punish faithless electors , [19] those who do not cast their electoral votes for the person whom they have pledged to elect.

In early January, the total Electoral College vote count is opened by the sitting Vice President, acting in his capacity as President of the Senate , and read aloud to a joint session of the incoming Congress, which was elected at the same time as the President.

If no candidate receives a majority of the electoral vote at least , the President is determined by the rules outlined by the 12th Amendment.

Specifically, the selection of President would then be decided by a contingent election in a ballot of the House of Representatives.

For the purposes of electing the President, each state has only one vote. A ballot of the Senate is held to choose the Vice President.

In this ballot, each senator has one vote. The House of Representatives has chosen the victor of the presidential race only twice, in and ; the Senate has chosen the victor of the vice-presidential race only once, in If neither are chosen by then, Congress by law determines who shall act as President, pursuant to the 20th Amendment.

Unless there are faithless electors, disputes, or other controversies, the events in December and January mentioned above are largely a formality since the winner can be determined based on the state-by-state popular vote results.

Between the general election and Inauguration Day, this apparent winner is referred to as the " President-elect " unless it is a sitting President that has won re-election.

The typical periods of the presidential election process are as follows, with the dates corresponding to the general election:.

Among the 44 persons who have served as president, only Donald Trump had never held a position in either government or the military prior to taking office.

Grant , and Dwight D. Eisenhower had was in the military. Herbert Hoover previously served as the Secretary of Commerce.

Everyone else served in elected public office before becoming president, such as being Vice President, a member of the United States Congress , or a state or territorial governor.

Fourteen Presidents also served as vice president. Bush began their first term after winning an election. The remaining nine began their first term as president according to the presidential line of succession after the intra-term death or resignation of their predecessor.

Truman , and Lyndon B. Arthur , and Gerald Ford were not. Ford's accession to the presidency is unique in American history in that he became vice president through the process prescribed by the Twenty-fifth Amendment rather than by winning an election, thus making him the only U.

Sixteen presidents had previously served in the U. Senate, including four of the five who served between and However, only three were incumbent senators at the time they were elected president Warren G.

Harding in , John F. Kennedy in , and Barack Obama in Eighteen presidents had earlier served in the House of Representatives. However, only one was a sitting representative when elected to presidency James A.

Bush have been governors of a state. Geographically, these presidents were from either very large states Reagan from California , Bush from Texas or from a state south of the Mason—Dixon line and east of Texas Carter from Georgia , Clinton from Arkansas.

In all, sixteen presidents have been former governors, including seven who were incumbent governors at the time of their election to the presidency. The most common job experience, occupation or profession of U.

Twenty-two presidents were also in the military. Eight presidents had served as Cabinet Secretaries, with five of the six Presidents who served between and having held the office of U.

Advances in technology and media have also affected presidential campaigns. The invention of both radio and television have given way to the reliance of national political advertisements across those methods of communication.

National advertisements such as Lyndon B. Bush 's commercial " Revolving Door " became major factors in those respective elections. In , George H.

Bush's promise of " Read my lips: Since the development of the internet in the mids, Internet activism has also become an invaluable component of presidential campaigns, especially since The internet was first used in the presidential elections, but primarily as a brochure for the candidate online.

In , both candidates George W. Bush and Al Gore created, maintained and updated their campaign website.

But it was not until the presidential election cycle was the potential value of the internet seen. By the summer of , ten people competing in the presidential election had developed campaign websites.

His website played a significant role in his overall campaign strategy. In , the internet became a grassroots and a voice of the people tool—a way for the users to connect with each other and with the campaign, like Dean's website had done in All of the major candidates had a website and utilized social networking like Facebook and MySpace.

The popularity of a candidate could be measured by the number of "friends" on these sites as well as on websites like Hitwise, which listed the number of hits all of the presidential candidate's websites had each week.

Internet channels such as YouTube were used by candidates to share speeches and ads for free.

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